Dr. Daniels is Professor of Education at Oxford University, director of the Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research and Professor of Education, Culture and Pedagogy at the University of Bath, UK. Dr. Daniels is also Adjunct Professor at Centre for Learning Research, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia, Research Professor at Centre for Human Activity Theory at Kansai University, Osaka, Japan, Research Professor in Cultural Historical Psychology at Moscow State University of Psychology & Education. Dr. Daniels` research includes work on processes of social exclusion and processes of collaboration. Daniels has directed more than 40 research projects funded by ESRC, various central and local government sources, The Lottery, The Nuffield Foundation and the EU. Professor`s extensive publications include a series of internationally acclaimed books in socio-cultural psychology. Dr. Daniels` latest books are: Vygotsky and Research. London: Routledge and The Cambridge Companion to Vygotsky (with Jim Wertsch and Michael Cole). Other relevant books include: Daniels, H. (2001) Vygotsky and Pedagogy. London: Routledge Moore, R., Arnot, M., Beck, J., and Daniels, H. (2006) Knowledge, Power and Educational Reform: Applying the sociology of Basil Bernstein. London: Routledge Yamazumi, K., Engestrom, Y. and Daniels, H. (Eds) (2005) New Learning Challenges: Going beyond the industrial age system of school and work. Osaka: Kansai University Press Daniels, H. (ed) (2005) An Introduction to Vygotsky (second edition) London: Routledge. Morais, A., Neves, I., Davies, B. & Daniels, H. (Eds.). (2001). Towards a sociology of pedagogy: The contribution of Basil Bernstein to research. New York. Peter Lang. Dr. Daniels` current research projects concern children who go missing from school and the implications of new school design for children’s experience of schooling. Two completed major studies; “Learning in and for interagency working: Multiagency work in Northern Ireland ESRC TLRP” and “Learning in and for Interagency Working ESRC TLRP”, were both rated ‘Outstanding’. Follow up work led to significant impact in practitioner/policy making bodies funded by a consortium of The Local Government Association, IdEA and Local Authorities Research Council Initiative.